Cox Tempe Series2 Solution/Workaround Jun 10, 2007 I recently purchased my first Tivo, an 80-hour Series2. I got home, hooked everything up, and after everything was setup I realized that Cox Communications in Tempe does not have any analog channels above 22(their “expanded” service). This made me really upset because I have lived in other areas in Phoenix and analog service above 22 was always available. I came to find out that in Tempe they are still using 550Mhz lines, which means they don’t have the bandwidth to put all of their services on so they took away the expanded channels from analog. ...
BES Problem Fixed May 29, 2007 After hours of staring at log files and trying everything known to man to get my BES server functioning properly, I finally found a fix. It was as simple as re-creating the user in eDirectory/GroupWise and then adding the user again in BES. It was that easy?! BLAH!
Blackberry Enterprise Server Issues May 28, 2007 I recently purchased a Blackberry 8703e from Sprint and so far it is an awesome device. This is the first blackberry that I’ve ever owned and I can’t believe it took me this long to get one! Unfortunately I have been having some big issues while trying to get BES to communicate with my device. I have a GroupWise system which BES talks with to synchronize my e-mail, calendar, contacts, etc,. ...
WPA Wireless Authentication with eDirectory and FreeRADIUS May 15, 2007 Recently I’ve been playing around with Open Enterprise Server again and I found this old article I wrote about integrating eDirectory with wireless auth. The goal of this article is to allow you to have your wireless access protected by WPA and have users authenticate to eDirectory for access to the wireless network. WPA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi_Protected_Access) is a wireless authentication standard used for controlling access to wireless networks. WPA can operate in a pre-shared key mode(router and client both know a secret password), or authentication can take place with a RADIUS server. ...
Open Source in the Enterprise May 07, 2007 Open source software has been around for a while in the enterprise server markets, but not in the desktop markets. In any given business you will most likely find Windows based desktops, with a small minority probably having Mac computers. The problem that I see with this is that when you start to employ thousands of Windows machines, your costs for licensing are insane. But with all the new user-friendly distributions of Linux, such as Ubuntu or OpenSUSE, it seems that it might be time to start evaluating some of these free desktop operating systems for use in the enterprise. ...
kqueue socket class May 07, 2007 Recently, I was researching a more efficient way for creating a TCP/IP server to handle multiple clients at once. I have used select() in the past, and that was probably the best thing I could find. I eventually came up with kqueue(), which is a way to asynchronously handle multiple sockets(or file descriptors). From what I read, it seemed to be a very efficient way to handle many clients. The only problem was that there was little information available for how to implement kqueue() in a sockets environment. ...
Anti-Spam for Wordpress May 07, 2007 I know that spam can be a real pain for blogs, so I decided to see what I could use for anti-spam for this blog. I’ve had blog spam in the past before, so I definitely needed to find something. I came across Peter’s Custom Anti-Spam Image Plugin for Wordpress. It wasn’t working for me at first, but I figured this out to be because I hadn’t installed the php gd extension. ...
Consumers and DRM content May 07, 2007 It makes me so angry sometimes to read about all the DRM’d content there is out there and how the consumer is the one who really gets screwed. If I purchase an HD-DVD or BluRay movie for $35 and I want to be able to rip the movie and put it into a storable format on my computer, I damn well should be able to. I suppose DRM exists to prevent piracy. ...
Virtualization -- IT's best friend May 07, 2007 I remember years ago whenever I wanted to play with a new server OS, it always required me to have a separate physical machine to run it on. This was a major drawback and made it difficult to experiment with designing server infrastructures consisting of multiple servers and tiers(clustering, load balancing, etc,.). If I wanted to load balance an Apache server and see the effects it had on the running application, it was difficult to emulate a bunch of Apache nodes running behind a load balancer because I only had access to one or two physical machines. ...
You Know You're in College When... May 06, 2007 Check out this list, I can definitely relate a lot of these.